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Resources

Patient Guide

12.21.22 - 4 min read

If you’re a new patient who’s curious about medical cannabis, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll guide you through all the essential info, empowering you with facts and knowledge to support your cannabis journey. Key topics include the potential benefits of the plant, usage guides for a variety of consumption methods and more. 

Benefits-CBD-patient-guide

Benefits of CBD

What is CBD?

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the main phytocannabinoids found in medicinal marijuana plants. Cannabinoids help to regulate a range of functions and processes within the human body. CBD does not produce the cognitive effects that THC may produce.

How does CBD work?

CBD interacts with a wide variety of receptors within our body to create different effects. CBD also boosts your body’s own endocannabinoids, allowing them to work more effectively.

How is CBD from a dispensary different from CBD purchased elsewhere?

CBD available outside of dispensaries is derived from hemp. The contents of hemp-derived CBD products are not federally regulated at this time, meaning they could have harsh chemicals or additives in them. Cannabis-derived CBD from our dispensary undergoes extensive third-party testing to prove its potency and safety.

Hemp is a fiber-type variety of cannabis sativa, which produces higher concentrations of CBD than THC. Medicinal marijuana is another variety of cannabis sativa which typically produces higher concentrations of THC than CBD.

Benefits-Terps-patient-guide

Benefits of Terpenes

What are terpenes?

Terpenes are organic compounds found in all kinds of plants, and are particularly important in medicinal cannabis. They give everything from rosemary to lemon their unique flavors and are responsible for the effects and aromas of different cannabis strains.

How do terpenes work?

Terpenes are not cannabinoids, but they do come from the same part Of the cannabis plant and work on your endocannabinoid system. When terpenes are combined or taken with cannabinoids, each can boost the benefits of the others. This is known as the “entourage effect”.

What are the different terpenes?

There are more than 20,000 terpenes in the plant world and over a hundred in cannabis alone, but there are a few key terpenes that have particular medicinal benefits.

Benefits-THC-patient-guide

Benefits of THC

What is THC?

THC is an abbreviation for the cannabinoid Tetrahydrocannabinol (TET•ra•HY•dro•CAN•nab•i•NOL). THC works with your body’s natural endocannabinoid.

How does THC work?

THC interacts to a specific endocannabinoid receptor in your body called CB1. These receptors are most concentrated in your nervous system, particularly in areas associated with thinking, pleasure, memory, and time perception.

Where does THC come from?

Fresh cannabis flower contains Tetrahydrocannabinolic Acid (THC-A), which becomes THC when heated or exposed to light. THC-A does not have the same effects as THC, but may have medicinal benefits of its own.

Are there different types of THC?

Yes. There are several forms of THC, each with their own benefits. Here are a few key ones to know:

  • .9-THC: The full scientific name of the THC found in prepared cannabis
  • .8-THC: A less-potent form of THC which can be made from hemp
  • THCV: An energizing but shorter-lasting cannabinoid which may suppress appetite.

How will THC make me feel?

The effects of THC depend on the quantity taken and the type of therapy used. Some CBD products contain small amounts of THC that likely will not produce cognitive effects, and some topicals containing THC likely will not produce effects either. In products that do produce cognitive effects, the experience depends on your frame of mind and setting, but can be quite pleasant when relaxed and in a comfortable setting.

How much THC should I take?

The best dose varies from person to person so we recommend starting low and increasing your dose slowly until you feel a benefit. For inhaled therapies, wait 15–30 minutes* after a dose to feel the full effects before you take more. For edible therapies, wait 2–3 hours* after a dose before taking more. We recommend settling on the lowest dose that helps with your symptoms.

I don’t want to feel “high”. Can I still take THC?

Yes. Some THC products like topicals do not produce cognitive effects, and balancing THC with CBD in other therapies can help to offset the “high feeling”. Talk to your patient care specialist, and they can help find the right product for you.

*Individual results may vary.

FAQs

The effects of THC depend on the quantity taken and the type of therapy used. Some CBD products contain small amounts of THC that likely will not produce cognitive effects, and some topicals containing THC likely will not produce effects either. In products that do produce cognitive effects, the experience depends on your frame of mind and setting, but can be quite pleasant when relaxed and in a comfortable setting.

Capsules-patient-guide

Capsules

All capsule bottles are required to be child resistant, so you will need to push down on the lid as you twist to open. There will be a label on your packaging which provides the cannabinoid content of your product (CBD and THC, for example). Capsules will provide for a delayed onset, anywhere between 30–180 minutes. Effects from orally consumed products will be longer-lasting compared to other forms of cannabis, so use caution. You may repeat doses as needed, and as you can tolerate. As with any medicinal cannabis product, the goal is to consume the least amount possible to achieve symptom relief. If you find yourself needing increasingly larger doses of products over time, please speak with a dispensary healthcare professional.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2689518/

*Individual results may vary

Concentrates-patient-guide

Concentrates

What you’ll need:

Pick the right vape device for the task. You will want to ensure your device has a chamber appropriate for concentrates! Choose your concentrate. Shatters, waxes, resins, and more! Each option provides a different consistency of cannabis oil for you to consume.

Two device examples:

  • Pax 3
  • Puffco Peak

How to consume:

Charge your battery! Load the chamber: place a small amount of concentrate in the heating chamber of your device. Remember, a little goes a long way with concentrates! Secure the mouthpiece to the device for proper inhalation. Press the button on your device to heat the coil in the chamber as you inhale. Start low and go slow. Begin with one small inhalation, wait a few minutes and monitor how you feel before repeating your dose. Clean your device chamber frequently to avoid damage! *Individual results may vary.

Edibles-patient-guide

Edibles

When vaping medical cannabis, compounds called “cannabinoids” and “terpenes” enter your bloodstream through your lungs. These compounds work together to create the effects you experience. Terpenes are the compounds that give cannabis its aroma and taste, while cannabinoids unlock the different types of effects you feel in your body and mind. When you eat an edible, cannabinoids are metabolized by the liver instead of the lungs, delivering a delayed, more intense effect.

No Indica. No Sativa. No Worries!

Most edibles are made with “distillate,” or pure THC oil, because it generally lacks taste and aroma. When cannabis plants go through the distillation process, terpenes and other cannabinoids are stripped away, leaving mostly THC behind. This begs a very important question: How can an edible be classified as “Sativa” or “Indica” when it uses oil that is absent of the terpene profiles that are commonly associated with Indica and Sativa strains? While some may add back synthetic or cannabis-derived terpenes to support these classifications, there is no research that proves our bodies are able to fully absorb terpenes when ingested. What’s more important is to know that the effects you feel across consumption methods, whether inhalable or ingestible, will likely vary, even if both fall under the same classification.

The ABCs of THC and CBD

THC and CBD do different things, so be sure to check what’s in your edible. THC is widely known for its psychoactive effects, whereas CBD is known for calming effects that skip the psychoactive high. Not all edibles have both, so be sure to check the package to see what you’re signing up for!

*Individual results may vary

Flower-patient-guide

Flower

Does my flower contain THC?

Well, maybe a little….BUT the form of THC produced by the flower of the plant is THC-A, though. You’ll most likely see THC-A listed on your product label/testing results. THC-A will convert to THC when it is heated (smoked/vaporized) via a process called decarboxylation. Flower will also contain varying many other cannabinoids (CBD, CBN, CBG, etc.) and terpenes.

How can I consume flower?

Do I have to smoke it? NO, you can also vaporize your flower or cook with it to create your own edible products. Smoking uses a flame to combust the physical plant material, producing smoke for inhalation. With vaporizing, you load the flower into an ancillary device that heats the plant to a high enough temperature to lift the cannabis oil into a vapor that is inhaled into the lungs. When cannabis is inhaled into the lungs, it provides for a very quick onset of effect. Consumers usually report feeling effects within 1-5 minutes and may last up to 2-3 hours. You do not need to fill up your entire lung capacity with smoke or vapor to benefit from inhaled cannabis. Start with a 1-2 second inhalation, fill the rest of your lungs up with normal air in the same breath and exhale naturally. Monitor how your mind and body feel for 5-10 minutes before repeating your dose.

Inhalation-patient-guide

Inhalation Methods

Pre-rolls

Cannabis is rolled in paper & smoked like a cigarette.

Pipe

Cannabis is lit & smoked in a glass pipe.

Waterpipe

Combusted cannabis is bubbled through water, then resulting smoke is inhaled.

Rechargeable Concentrate Pen

Cannabis is concentrated into wax, oil or hash & vaporized through an e-cigarette.

Concentrate Vaporizer

Cannabis is concentrated into hash, rosin, wax or shatter, which is then heated to temperatures ranging from 330-600°, & vapors are inhaled.

Vape Pen

Cannabis oil is housed in a cartridge or “pod,” which is attached to a battery. Oil is heated with a ceramic or metal coil & vapors are inhaled.

RSO-patient-guide

RSO

What is Rick Simpson Oil?

R.S.O. is a full-spectrum cannabis oil extract which can be taken orally or used topically. Full-spectrum extracts maintain the full profile of a cannabis plant; cannabinoids and terpenes.

How to consume R.S.O:

Your R.S.O. product will come in a glass or plastic measuring syringe. Carefully extract the stopper on the syringe before administering the product, and replace the cap directly after use. Consumers should be extremely cautious with oral dosing of R.S.O., as the oil most likely contains high concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol (T.H.C.). Consuming too much T.H.C. may cause you to feel paranoid or anxious. Begin with a very small amount of oil; we recommend using the end of a toothpick to remove a dot that is. the size of a piece of uncooked rice from the end of your syringe. Remember – this product is very concentrated so a little bit goes a long way!

Oral Dosing

You can put the oil onto food, mix into a beverage or add to an empty capsule to swallow. Effects will be slightly delayed, so wait 3 hours before repeating a dose.

Sublingual dosing:

For a faster onset of effect, rub oil directly onto your gums. Place the oil onto a piece of hard candy and hold in your mouth if you need to mask the taste.

Topical use:

R.S.O. can also be used topically for various skin conditions. Mix with coconut oil for easier application.

*Individual results may vary

Tinctures-patient-guide

Tinctures

Your product will come with a pre-marked dropper like the one pictured above. All solution bottles are child-safe, so you will need to push down on the cap as you twist to open. There will be a dropper attached to the lid of your solution product. Using the dropper provided will allow you to draw up the appropriate dose accurately. For a faster onset of effect, hold the solution under the tongue for 2–3 minutes before swallowing. For a delayed onset, swallow solution instead of holding under the tongue.

You may repeat doses as needed, and as you can tolerate. As with any medicinal cannabis product, the goal is to consume the least amount possible to achieve symptom relief. If you find yourself needing increasingly larger doses of products over time, please speak with a dispensary healthcare professional.

*Individual results may vary

Topicals-patient-guide

Topicals

Topical products can include lotions, balms, creams and patches. These options can either provide for a localized effect (meant to stay in the area of application) or a systemic effect (whole-body). It’s important to ask your patient care specialist for specifics on the product you’re interested in! Systemic THC products have the potential to produce some psychoactive effects.

Medical cannabis topicals will come in many different formulations and may have CBD, THC or may contain different ratios of both CBD and THC.

*Individual results may vary

Vape-Carts-patient-guide

Vape Cartridge

Vape Oil Cartridges

A vape oil cartridge is a glass cartridge pre-filled with medical cannabis oil. This oil contains various combinations of cannabinoids and terpenes extracted from cannabis. Vape oil cartridges come in many forms: 510-threaded cartridges (the most common), as well as some proprietary forms like Pax Era Pods and Airo Pro oil cartridges.

How do vape pens work?

Vape oil cartridges work in conjunction with vape pen batteries. The vape battery will power an atomizer in the cartridge that heats up the oil, activating the various chemical components in it. You then inhale the vapor, which produces the effects of medical cannabis. Some vape batteries have multiple functions that enable temperature customization and dose management, while others are draw-activated and do not require the user to press any buttons to power.

Why choose a vape oil cartridge?

Here are some of the benefits:

Ease of use:

Vape oil cartridges take the guesswork completely out of the equation. Contrary to other methods of consuming oil, carts require little-to-no effort, just press a button and inhale.

Portability:

Vape oil carts are the easiest method of taking medical cannabis while on-the-go. Their sleek and minimalist design allows for discreet vaping, free of the distracting traits of larger setups, and they do not produce noticeable vapor or odor. Unlike concentrates, using a pre-loaded vape pen allows for a highly controlled dose with each inhalation, giving you more control over how much or how little you consume.

How to use a vape pen

It’s pretty simple: Just attach your cart to the battery to start! If there’s an On/Off button, use it.

A few quick tips:

  • If your device has an On/Off button, chances are you turn it on by clicking 5 times. The same number turns it off.
  • Make sure your cart is completely attached to its battery to avoid any oil leakage.
  • Keep your vape pen upright to avoid oil leakage.
  • Start slow with dosing. Begin with just 1-2 inhalations to start; monitor how your mind and body feel for a few minutes before repeating your dose.
  • Monitor temperature to make sure your cart isn’t burning too hot, which could alter some of the oil’s chemical components—usually 3 clicks will adjust the temperature on a button-activated battery.

What is a 510 cartridge?

A 510-thread cartridge is the most common type of vape oil cartridge. “510” describes the type of threading that is used to screw the bottom of the cartridge to the appropriate vape battery. Ask a patient care specialist which battery is right for your cartridge!

How long does a vape oil cartridge last?

How long a vape oil cartridge lasts entirely depends on an individual’s rate of consumption and the amount of vapor inhaled with each dose.

Why isn’t my cart full?

  • Air pressure in the cart can lower the oil level
  • The cart reservoir might intentionally be designed to be larger
  • Extracted oil may be absorbed in the ceramic heating element

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